Radioactive dating uranium

31-Aug-2016 12:01

The radiation level drops to about 1 Sv/h after 50 years, 0.3 Sv/h after 100 years, and less than 0.001 Sv/h (100 mrem/h) after 500 years.

At this time the major hazard from the used fuel is no longer one of external exposure; for example, by these estimates, spending an hour about a foot away from a 500-year-old CANDU fuel bundle would result in radiation dose about 1/4 of the average annual background exposure, and thousands of times less than what is known to lead to physical harm.

About three metres of water are sufficient to absorb the radiation emitted initially by the used fuel, while in the dry-storage phase about a metre of concrete suffices.

The radiation accounting for this heating creates a simultaneous need for shielding.The need to adequately isolate the radionuclides in used nuclear fuel from the biosphere was recognized at the outset of Canada's nuclear program in the late 1940s and 1950s, with research and development in this field progressing apace with the development of the industry.As Canada's nuclear power program geared up in the 1950s the research focused upon the reprocessing and subsequent recycling of the useful fraction of used fuel, due to the then-perceived limited availability of uranium ore.Arthur Porter and known as the "Porter Commission") [9, 10].In response to the Hare Report, the governments of Canada and Ontario jointly established in 1978 the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP).

The radiation accounting for this heating creates a simultaneous need for shielding.

The need to adequately isolate the radionuclides in used nuclear fuel from the biosphere was recognized at the outset of Canada's nuclear program in the late 1940s and 1950s, with research and development in this field progressing apace with the development of the industry.

As Canada's nuclear power program geared up in the 1950s the research focused upon the reprocessing and subsequent recycling of the useful fraction of used fuel, due to the then-perceived limited availability of uranium ore.

Arthur Porter and known as the "Porter Commission") [9, 10].

In response to the Hare Report, the governments of Canada and Ontario jointly established in 1978 the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP).

In Canada, "high-level nuclear waste" refers to used nuclear reactor fuel, sometimes referred to as "spent nuclear fuel" or "nuclear fuel waste".